personal geographies opens july 6

friend one | mary jones

Omahans across the city will be exposed to printmaking in all its forms this July in conjunction with the 2018 edition of Frogman’s Print Workshops at the University of Nebraska at Omaha.

At the little gallery, Personal Geographies featuring works by Diana Behl, Tiberiu Chelcea, Sage Dawson and Mary Jones opens Friday, July 6, with a reception from 6:00 to 9:00pm. The event is free and open to the public.

Behl, Chelcea, Dawson and Jones use mapping conventions to talk about the passage of time and examine the essence of places seen, overlooked or imagined.

Drawing, screenprinting, collagraph, intaglio, photopolymer intaglio, relief and digital printmaking have been used in combination with other methods to distill data into patterns and textures. These symbolically and visually rich works present themselves as puzzles to solve and provide a means of finding one’s way through complex information.

Personal Geographies runs through July 29 at the little gallery, 5901 Maple Street. Hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday from 3:00 to 6:00pm, Saturday from 10:00am to 1:00pm and by appointment. The little gallery is powered by Polecat Communications. For more information, call 402.681.1901 or email info@polecatcommunications.com.

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Frogman’s began humbly in 1979 when Professor Lloyd Menard led five school teachers from Sioux City, Iowa, to the Black Hills of South Dakota for a drawing class. Prints were first introduced in 1981, and the workshops evolved into the Black Hills Print Symposium, which took place at various sites in western South Dakota. By 1996, the workshops had outgrown the confines of the Black Hills and were moved to Beresford, South Dakota, home of Frogman’s Press & Gallery. The workshops would only spend two years based out of Beresford before moving to nearby Vermillion and the University of South Dakota. In 2016, Frogman’s made the big leap to the University of Nebraska at Omaha, where the Frogman took his first ever print class more than 50 years ago.

5 with katie b temple

Home Sweet Home by Katie B Temple opens Friday, June 1, at the little gallery, 5901 Maple Street in downtown Benson. The opening reception is set for 6:00 to 9:00pm in conjunction with the June edition of Benson First Friday. Below is a Q&A with the artist.

When did you know you were going to be an artist?

I became serious about being an artist my junior year of undergrad. I switched from majoring in art education to studio art. I was accepted into graduate school when I was 21 (senior year of my undergrad) and that really made everything EXTRA serious.

Describe your process.

I often scour websites to find houses that are for sale, for rent or foreclosed and then go take reference photos of them from specific perspectives. Once the reference imagery has been taken, I begin constructing and layering multiple buildings on top of each other in a single painting. I usually do not have an idea of what the painting will look like at the end, so I use my intuition as an artist to make visual decisions based on the character of the buildings being used. I am inspired by the color(s) of the house(s) that I am painting, and that helps me with color scheme decisions. The structural play of dense, transparent and opaque color blocking in the paintings present a whirlwind of visual incident.

Where do you find inspiration?

As a visual artist, I am constantly observing the world around me. In my current series of architectural paintings, I am inspired by ‘empty’ homes located in Omaha, Nebraska. ‘Empty’ makes reference to homes that are not currently occupied. They may be between renters, on the market to sell, foreclosed by the bank or just abandoned. I began this body of work when a house across the street from my studio suddenly went from occupied to foreclosed. What was once an energetic, busy home is now a boarded-up, sterile structure. It made me reflect on the 15 different buildings I have called ‘home’ throughout my life and how they each were a vessel that held me.

Name the 3 most important things in your studio space.

1. Lively music!
2. High-quality brushes!
3. Good lighting!

What do you want others to know about you/your work?

I have my Master’s of Fine Arts degree and work full time with the Kent Bellows Mentoring Program at Joslyn Art Museum as the studio coordinator. Being a part of Omaha’s nonprofit arts community is important to who I am as a creative individual. I truly enjoy creating an open space for Omaha youth to be their authentic selves and be creative in a variety of mediums.

Home Sweet Home runs through June 30 at the little gallery. Hours of operation are:

Tuesday-Friday
3:00 to 6:00pm

Saturday
10:00am to 1:00pm

+ by appointment

the little gallery is 3, home sweet home opens june 1


The little gallery will celebrate its third anniversary Friday, June 1, with cake, a pinata full of treasures and the opening of “Home Sweet Home” by Katie B. Temple. The reception, which is free and open to the public, runs from 6:00 to 9:00pm at 5901 Maple Street in downtown Benson.

Temple, an Omaha artist and educator, is the studio coordinator for the Kent Bellows Mentoring Program at Joslyn Art Museum. “Home Sweet Home” was inspired by homes in Omaha that aren’t currently occupied.

“They may be between renters, on the market to sell, foreclosed by the bank or just abandoned,” Temple said. “I began this body of work when a home across the street from my studio suddenly went from occupied to unoccupied. What was once an energetic, busy home was now a foreclosed, boarded-up, sterile structure. It made me reflect on the 15 different structures I have called ‘home’ throughout my life and how they each were a vessel that helped me.”

Temple earned her BFA from Bowling Green State University and her MFA from Montana State University. Her work has been featured in various national exhibitions. Locally, she has been included in the top 10 list of “Best Exhibitions of 2016 in Omaha” by The Reader and was a 2017 nominee for Best Visual Emerging Artist from the Omaha Arts and Entertainment Awards (OEAA). Temple also was nominated for two 2018 OEAA awards – one for Best Visual Emerging Artist and one for Best Presentation in a Non-Traditional Format.

For more information about Temple’s work, visit www.katiebtemple.com.

The little gallery is open Tuesday through Friday from 3:00 to 6:00pm, Saturday from 10:00am to 1:00pm and by appointment. For more information, call 402.681.1901.

it’s not a phase, mom opens may 4

Stressed Out
Zoe Gaupp
Mixed media
NFS

The little gallery will host its first ever teen art show in conjunction with the May 2018 edition of Benson First Friday.

An opening reception for “It’s Not a Phase, Mom” is set for Friday, May 4, from 6:00 to 9:00pm. The exhibition, which features works by local teens across the metro, is curated by Allison Harris, the little gallery’s intern and a senior at Central High School. “My goal was to showcase the young talent I’ve seen in Omaha from my peers,” Harris said. “The little gallery gave me the ability to show my work while I was in high school, and I wanted to give other young artists the same opportunity.”

The show runs through May 26 at the little gallery, 5901 Maple Street in downtown Benson. Hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday from 3:00 to 6:00pm, Saturday from 10:00am to 1:00pm and by appointment. For more information, call 402.681.1901.

Facebook event

elements opens april 6

“Earth Elements” by Aimee Mahan, $750.

Elements opens Friday, April 6, at the little gallery, 5901 Maple Street in downtown Benson. The exhibition features the work of 15 members of the Midwest Fiber Art Alliance (MFAA). The opening reception runs from 6:00 to 9:00pm, and all are welcome to attend.

Each piece in the show represents the artist’s interpretation of the theme “ancient elements.” The featured artists are:

  • Rhonda Baldwin
  • Marge Bresel
  • Shelly Burge
  • Gail Dickel
  • Jo Drueke
  • LaVonne Dunetts
  • Cindy Erickson
  • Debo Hysack
  • Cynthia Levis
  • Aimee Mahan
  • Wendy Maliszewski
  • Marcia O’Donovan
  • Peg Pennell
  • Cindy Schroeder
  • Dianne Thomas

The MFAA consists of about 20 local artists who have joined together to produce fiber-centered art to be displayed in a gallery setting. The group selects a yearly theme and parameters that guide the creative process.

Elements runs through April 28 at the little gallery. Hours of operation are Tuesday through Friday from 3:00 to 6:00pm, Saturday from 10:00am to 1:00pm and by appointment. For more information, call 402.681.1901.

5 with sophie newell

Fragments by Sophie Newell opens Friday, Feb. 2, at the little gallery, 5901 Maple St. The reception, which is free and open to the public, runs from 6:00 to 9:00pm. Below is a Q&A with the artist.

Q: When did you know you were going to be an artist?

There was no definitive moment. I have always been artistic and creative, so art was something I just assumed would always be part of my life. My concentration in college was illustration, so I wouldn’t have necessarily called myself an artist at that time, but I think in the last few years, my focus has shifted toward more personal and self-initiated work.

Q: Describe your process.

I use a variety of mediums and processes, but my work is chiefly collage. I collect old photographs, textbooks, encyclopedias and all kinds of ephemera, and layer the materials until I have a composition that speaks to me. I often use digital tools, such as Photoshop, to combine layers of controlled and precise imagery and shapes with areas of more expressive mark making and texture. Although my pieces are two-dimensional, I want them to retain a tactile quality.

Q: Where do you find inspiration?

I am excited by the idea of telling stories through objects. I relish working with found materials, especially ephemera, photographs and old books I find in thrift stores, as each piece of notepaper, label or ticket has a history that to me is personal and intriguing.

Q: Name the 3 most important things in your studio space.

I would be lost without my collection of found papers. I’ve been hoarding paper scraps for years and can’t bear to throw anything away in case one day it will be the perfect final segment of a piece I’m working on. I also use my scanner and computer every day for research, cataloguing found materials and to create my digital pieces.

Q: What do you want others to know about you/your work?

I often venture into themes of maps, journeys and biographies, and use found objects and photographs to create original pieces that tell a life story. The pieces in this exhibition are inspired by and based on a found scrapbook made in the 1920s by my husband’s great-grandmother, Louise Plunkett.

fragments opens feb. 2 at the little gallery

Fragments by Sophie Newell opens Friday, Feb. 2, at the little gallery, 5901 Maple Street in downtown Benson. The reception runs from 6:00 to 9:00pm.

Newell is a mixed media artist who works mainly with drawing, collage and digital tools. Originally from Manchester, England, she attended Edinburgh College of Art and received a BA in Visual Communication in 2009. She has exhibited work in both the United States and the United Kingdom, and has lived in Omaha since 2014.

Below is her artist’s statement:

“I am fascinated by themes ranging from maps and journeys to biography and the idea of telling stories through objects. I often venture into this subject by using found objects and photographs to create original pieces that tell a life story, either real or imagined.

Fragments is a response to a found scrapbook made by teenager Louise Plunkett in the early to mid 1920s. Louise grew up in Council Bluffs and Omaha, and the book documents her high school years at Abraham Lincoln and then Omaha South high schools. The pages include letters from friends, newspaper clippings, photographs and event tickets, and include handwritten captions and comments scrawled in the margins.

By using imagery and text from the book, I aim to elevate and preserve the ephemeral. The intimate process of sifting through a stranger’s memories allowed me to form a personal connection to Louise through the mementos she kept. This collection is my exploratory attempt to ‘connect the dots’ and construct a narrative from these remnants.”

Fragments runs through Feb. 24 at the little gallery. Hours are Tuesday through Friday from 3:00 to 6:00pm, Saturday from 10:00am to 1:00pm and by appointment. For more information, call 402.681.1901.

works by steve schneider opens jan. 5

Works by Steve Schneider opens Friday, Jan. 5, at the little gallery, 5901 Maple Street in downtown Benson. The reception runs from 6:00 to 9:00pm.

Schneider worked in the Old Market during the 1980s. The pieces in this show are part of the Kenny Carter Collection at the little gallery. Each work is roughly 30″ x 22″ and is priced at $75. The show runs through Jan. 27.

Gallery hours are Tuesday-Friday from 3:00 to 6:00pm, Saturday from 10:00am to 1:00pm + by appointment. Questions? Call 402.681.1901.

third annual little show opens dec. 1

The third annual little show opens Friday, Dec. 1, at the little gallery, 5901 Maple Street in beautiful downtown Benson.

All works in the main gallery are 12″ x 12″ or smaller and retail for $100 or less – get your holiday shopping done for the art lover on your list!

Featuring works in the main gallery by:

  • Jill Becker
  • J.J. Carroll
  • Alex Jochim
  • Isaac Kleven
  • Chad Leahy
  • Mike Loftus
  • Debbie Martin
  • Nebraska Department of Motor Vehicles
  • Sophie Newell
  • Jim Pattavina
  • Jason Steady
  • Torrey Smith
  • Trudy Swanson
  • Brad Thiel
  • Jadon Ulrich
  • + a few surprises

You can also shop the annex @the little gallery for larger works at various prices.

The show runs through Dec. 30. Gallery hours are Tuesday-Friday from 3 to 6, Saturday from 10 to 1 + by appointment. For more information, call 402.681.1901 or email info@polecatcommunications.com.

Pictured at right: “Pigfast” by J.J. Carroll

one year later: trumplings opens nov. 3

For Bart Vargas, waking up on Nov. 9, 2016, felt like living in an episode of “Black Mirror,” the sci-fi thriller on Netflix. The Omaha artist said he felt the need to express his emotions about the results of the U.S. presidential election and this new era of America’s collective history.

After more than 11 months of work, the result is “One Year Later: Trumplings,” which opens Friday, Nov. 3, at the little gallery. The exhibition and fundraiser will showcase more than 300 ceramic effigies of President Trump created by Vargas.

The three-dimensional works come in two versions: Trumplings – the president’s head on the body of a baby, and Twitter Twits – the president’s head on the body of a bird. The first Trumpling was cast on the day of Trump’s inauguration, and Vargas has committed to casting a piece every day while Trump is in office.

All gallery proceeds and a major portion of the artist’s commission from sales will benefit local nonprofits affected by President Trump’s administration, including Planned Parenthood of the Heartland.

“One Year Later: Trumplings” runs through Nov. 30. Gallery hours are Tuesday through Friday from 3:00 to 6:00pm, Saturdays from 10:00am to 1:00pm and by appointment. For more information, call 402.681.1901.